New Study Shows Human Health Benefits of Soot-Scrubbing Trees

A new study published in the journal Environmental Pollution makes the first conclusive case for the ability of urban foliage to reduce fine particle pollution, reducing breathing problems and saving lives in the process.
July 15, 2013, 7am PDT | Jonathan Nettler | @nettsj
Share Tweet LinkedIn Email Comments

"Trees do more than just clear the air and provide shade from the hot summer sun," writes Timothy B. Wheeler. "Though no panacea, they can make cities like Baltimore healthier, a recent study suggests."

"Using computer modeling to quantify the health benefits of trees in 10 cities, including Baltimore, researchers with the U.S. Forest Service and a private think tank say leafy foliage in urban areas can scrub enough soot out of the air to reduce asthma attacks, emergency room visits and even deaths."

"'It's the first time we've actually been able to tie it to human health, which is pretty exciting,' said David J. Nowak, a federal research forester and lead author of the report. Collaborating on the study was the Davey Institute, the research arm of an Ohio-based tree care company."


Full Story:
Published on Sunday, July 14, 2013 in The Baltimore Sun
Share Tweet LinkedIn Email