A Simple Solution to Kabul's Massive Traffic Problem

The proposal is simple. Instead of investing billions of dollars more on elaborate infrastructure or trust a corrupted police force, the concept is to nudge this complex system at two targeted points in the city, argues Mitchell Sutika Sipus.

The reconstruction of Kabul, Afghanistan has been a struggle as city infrastructure can only accommodate about 3 million inhabitants, yet the city presently consists of nearly 6 million people. Everyday the city is stuck in constant gridlock for hours at a time. Initiatives thus far have focused on road construction and law enforcement, but these approaches have caused even more delays and further congested an already broken system.

Sutika Sipus's proposal recognizes Kabul traffic is a self organized system determined by many variables. The concept is to inject simple incentives to nudge this system, targeted in two particular locations. The solution functions by shifting some existing resources and using a very low-tech monitoring system to offset corruption, summed up into four easy steps.

Full Story: A Simple Solution to Kabul's Massive Traffic Problem

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