NYC Cleans Up Subways by...Removing Trash Cans?

It seems to work for the spotless Tokyo subway system, but in grimy New York? A pilot program that removed trash cans in select NYC subway stations resulted in decreased trash hauls (duh) and cleaner stations (huh). Now it's being expanded.
September 1, 2012, 1pm PDT | Jonathan Nettler | @nettsj
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Matt Flegenheimer reports on the New York Metropolitan Transportation Authority's (MTA) counter-intuitive plan to clean up its subway stations by removing trash receptacles. "Officials have described the logic of the program simply: If there is nowhere to discard trash, riders will take it with them - often outside of a station."

"Some riders, though, have expressed reservations about the plan," notes Flegenheimer. "Less trash, they argue, does not imply a more hygienic subway experience."

"'I don't know what to do with this,' Christopher DiScipio, 22, said on Thursday clutching a nearly-finished apple at the Eighth Street station."

"Nearby, in a narrow alcove between a pay phone kiosk and a vertical beam, riders appeared to have fashioned a rogue receptacle. Detritus piled about three feet high - a mélange of crushed energy drink cans; bottles of water and, in at least one case, vodka; mounds of wrappers and paper cups; and what appeared to have once been a white T-shirt."

 

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Published on Thursday, August 30, 2012 in The New York Times
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