What Makes a Great Neighborhood?

Howard Blackson explains the five elements ("five Cs") necessary for planning resilient and lively neighborhoods - complete, compact, connected, complex, and convivial.
August 31, 2012, 10am PDT | Jonathan Nettler | @nettsj
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Rather than focus planning at the level of "community", which is inherently difficult to define, Blackson argues that the neighborhood unit, "is a better tool to define, plan, and express policies and regulations necessary to preserve, enhance and, yes, build great places."

It's at the level of the neighborhood unit that Blackson's 5 Cs apply. To be complete, great neighborhoods must have a mix of uses and a defined center, middle, and edge. To be connected, they must go beyond accessibility to include opportunities for social connection. "[T]he coffee shops, pubs, ice creme shops, churches, clubhouses, parks, front yards, street fairs, block parties, living rooms, back yards, stoops, dog parks, restaurants and plazas," that connect people, also lead to the 5th C - conviviality.

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Published on Thursday, August 30, 2012 in Better! Cities & Towns
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