Which Cities Have the Worst Drivers?

In an age of increasingly distracted drivers, it's getting ever more hazardous to ply America's urban roads. The eighth annual “America’s Best Drivers Report,” issued by Allstate Insurance, explores exactly which cities are the most dangerous.

Whether explained by its large number of non-native residents or, perhaps, its confusing system of roads planned long before the advent of the horseless carriage, Washington D.C. has the dubious distinction of being home to America's most dangerous drivers. 

According to Jim Gorzelany, "Allstate studied the auto insurance claims frequency of America's 200 largest cities and found that residents of our nation's capitol were found to get into collisions on average once every 4.7 years. This means they're a whopping 112.1 percent more likely to be party to an accident than the typical driver in the U.S., who wrecks his or her car once every 10 years."

"Taken on a state-wide basis, California would seem to have the worst drivers overall, placing five cities among the top 25, including Glendale (5), San Francisco (10), Los Angeles (14), Fullerton (16) and Torrence (22). New Jersey came in a close second with four cities among the top 25, with Florida and Virginia tied for third with three cities each."

"Meanwhile, the safest drivers can be found trolling the streets of Sioux Falls, South Dakota, where the average motorist experiences a collision only once every 13.8 years, which is 27.6 percent less likely than the national average. Other top-five safest cities include (in order): Boise, ID; Fort Collins, CO; Madison, WI and Lincoln, NE."

 

Full Story: Cities With The Worst Drivers 2012

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