Is Portland Well Planned? Its Mayor Doesn't Think So

Mayor Sam Adams pens an opinion piece for <em>Grist</em> in which he considers why Portland is not as well planned as it could be, and how a different approach to planning is necessary for American cities to address their most pressing challenges.
May 3, 2012, 2pm PDT | Jonathan Nettler | @nettsj
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Decrying the inability of the federal government to move cities forward and the lack of "meaningful" statewide strategic planning, Adams argues that, "The kind of strategic change this nation needs must start at the local level," with integrated strategic planning. He continues, "We need plans based less on politics and more on the facts; plans with integrated strategies and a short list of specific measures to provide public accountability for real results."

Examining the recently adopted Portland Plan, which focused on integrating actions so that "success in one area is designed to improve them all," Adams argues that that, "If more locales had integrated strategic plans, they would use resources more efficiently; in turn, that might inspire state and federal government efforts that are more grounded, realistic, and effective."

"Prosperous, educated, healthy, equitable: Taken together, these four interlocking goals of our Portland Plan are the building blocks of a self-reliant city, a Portland where people truly thrive. I hope local governments in all metropolitan regions will join us."

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Published on Wednesday, May 2, 2012 in Grist
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