Poor Roads Threaten Low-Income Neighborhoods

Angie Schmitt reports on the results of a new study tying low-income neighborhoods to much higher rates of pedestrian, cyclist, and motorist injuries.
April 25, 2012, 1pm PDT | Jonathan Nettler | @nettsj
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The study, published recently in the American Journal of Public Health, tracked the rates of injury for pedestrians, cyclists, and motorists in Montreal over a five-year period. As Schmitt notes, "They found pedestrians living in low-income neighborhoods were more than six times more likely to be injured by a moving vehicle than those from high-income neighborhoods." Injury rates for motorists and cyclists in such areas were higher as well, with each around four times as likely to be injured as those in high-income neighborhoods.

"The reason, researchers said, was 'exposure to traffic.' The study found that low-income neighborhoods were more likely to contain major arterials and four-way intersections - two of the biggest risk factors for those traveling by any mode. The study also found low-income neighborhoods were subject to traffic volumes 2.4 times greater than high-income - one of the best predictors of injury."

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Published on Tuesday, April 24, 2012 in Streetsblog D.C.
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