In Defense of the Grid

Paul Knight delivers an impassioned defense of the gridded urban form against its many criticisms -- that its boring, its unnatural, its only use is to maximize profits for developers, etc.
January 23, 2012, 1pm PST | Jonathan Nettler | @nettsj
Share Tweet LinkedIn Email Comments

Using images and historical examples to bolster his own perceptions, Knight addresses some common fallacies in defense of the grid.

For example:

On the claim the grid is boring: "The grid generates neither excitement nor monotony though it does provide for both equally. Again, the grid is simply what your city makes of it."

On the claim the grid is a tool for speculators: "William Penn founded Philadelphia on the grid plan partly because it created equal lots and blocks everywhere. Thus, his concept of brotherhood and equality was embodied in the plan itself."

On the claim that the grid only belongs in urban centers: "Remember the obvious-a continuous grid of nothing but orthogonal blocks can harbor everything from farms to skyscrapers. The only thing a grid plan does is subdivide territory."

Full Story:
Published on Sunday, January 22, 2012 in TheGreatAmericanGrid.com
Share Tweet LinkedIn Email