Congressional Redistricting Leaves Cities Split

Urban areas have been historically shortchanged when drawing Congressional district lines, and some mayors are less than thrilled to see their municipalities "carved up." Michael Cooper reports.

"The mayor of Austin, Lee Leffingwell, said he still wished that the city had its own district. 'Our voice is better heard with a district that is totally within the city of Austin,' he said.

Not everyone agrees. When officials in High Point, N.C., worried that their city was being split, one council member, Michael Pugh, said he thought that more representatives might be a good thing. 'I had rather talk to eight ears than four ears,' Mr. Pugh said, adding that more representatives would get seats on more committees in Congress."

Full Story: Some Cities Object to Being Carved Up by Redistricting

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