The Trouble with Radioactive Water

Grist delves into the responses and repercussions of a recent New York Times story about contaminated water in Pittsburgh caused by a method of extracting natural gas known as hydraulic fracturing or fracking.

The former head of Pennsylvania's Department of Environmental Protection say the story's most damning revelations are accurate, but also points out some exaggerations. Other groups have also responded.

"Hanger also says there are a number of oversights in the Times article: He says it unfairly characterizes Pennsylvania's response to the fracking crisis. Under his tenure, the number of gas-well inspectors doubled and a number of new regulations were put in place -- basically, he makes the case that Pennsylvania would be much worse off if it weren't for its efforts to curb the worst atrocities of fracking.

Industry dodges on the issue of radiation: A rebuttal of the Times piece by an industry group, the Marcellus Shale Coalition, does not even address the issue of radium in the wastewater that is dumped from fracking operations into water-treatment plants and thence water sources that are ultimately used by cities for drinking water."

Full Story: Pittsburgh’s drinking water is radioactive, thanks to fracking. Only question is, how much?

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