Creating Communities To Grow Old In

Meeting the needs of aging residents has been a challenge for many cities. Some suburban communities are pioneering the conversion to an elder-friendly layout.
September 22, 2009, 7am PDT | Nate Berg
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More places are responding to the desires of older residents who want to remain in their communities as long as they can. But doing so can be a challenge.

"As simple or as practical as that idea might sound, reshaping suburbia requires elected officials like Mr. Steele, as well as planners, developers, architects and builders, to address a host of issues. They can be as large as transportation networks and zoning codes, and as small as the type of cooktop installed in a condominium's new kitchen, one that has to be safe for people ages nine through 90.

'From the region down to the doorknob-that's the challenge: integrating it all,' says Andrés Duany, co-founder of Duany Plater-Zyberk & Co., an international planning and architectural firm based in Miami, and a leading voice in efforts to retrofit suburbia."

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Published on Saturday, September 19, 2009 in The Wall Street Journal
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