Swine Flu and the Prospects for Urban Agriculture

The present threat of a global pandemic reveals the fundamental problem with visions for 'sustainable cities' relying on urban agriculture: there are important medical reasons for separating livestock operations from people.

"It's interesting to note...that swine flu, unsurprisingly, comes from 'close contact with pigs' – that is, spatial proximity between humans and their livestock. Swine flu, we could say, is a spatial problem – an epiphenomenon of landscape.

[T]here were very real epidemiological reasons for taking agriculture out of the city; finding a new place for urban farms will thus not only require very intense new spatial codes, it will demand constant vigilance in researching and developing inoculations. Few people want to see burning piles of livestock in Times Square or Griffith Park, let alone piles of human corpses infected with H5N1.

Avian flu, foot-and-mouth disease, swine flu: if these are spatially activated, so to speak, and spread through certain unrecommended proximities between humans and animals, then urban design's medical undergirding is again revealed. The space around you is no mere stylization; it is a strategy of containment. The modern city [is not just] a place to live – but also a functioning medical instrument."

Full Story: This Diseased Utopia: 10 Thoughts on Swine Flu and the City

Comments

Comments

'Urban' Agriculture?

Methinks these insights are at least a millennium too late - or does the author think the intensive agriculture practices that concentrate humans, ducks, chickens, pigs and their wastes all over S.E. Asia and China* are likely to be abolished? There are millions of rural bioreactors percolating impromptu genetic recombination all over the globe, absent most of the oversight and regulation that would be more likely for their 'city cousins'...

*And, yes, in the rural U.S. and Mexico:

http://www.guardian.co.uk/commentisfree/2009/apr/28/swine-flu-intensive-...

Book cover of the Guide to Graduate Planning Programs 4th Edition

Thinking about Grad School?

New! 4th Edition of the Planetizen Guide to Graduate Urban Planning Programs just released.
Starting at $24.95

Prepare for the AICP Exam

Join the thousands of students who have utilized the Planetizen AICP* Exam Preparation Class to prepare for the American Planning Association's AICP* exam.
Starting at $209
Woman wearing city map tote bag

City Shoulder Totes - New Cities Added!

Durable CityFabric© shoulder tote bags available from 7 different cities.
$22.00
Red necktie with map of Boston

Tie one on to celebrate your city

Choose from over 20 styles of neckties imprinted with detailed city or transit maps.
$44.95