Metropolitan Areas Drive Economies

Metropolitan regions are the most important factors in supporting prosperous economies. For national economies to succeed, metropolitan regions must succeed, according to this article from the <em>Brookings Institution</em>.
March 12, 2009, 2pm PDT | Nate Berg
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"Though our economic development policies don't reflect it, America doesn't really possess a national economy, or even a collection of 50 state economies. Instead, America's long-term prosperity stands or falls on the more local prosperity of its 363 distinct, varied, clustered, and interlinked metropolitan economies, dominated by the 100 largest metros-many of which cross county and state jurisdictions and incorporate multiple city centers, suburbs, exurbs, and downtowns in a way that the old hub-and-spoke model of urban geography never did. In that sense, America is quite literally a "MetroNation," utterly dependent on the success of its metropolitan hubs."

"From the hundreds of square miles that constitute contemporary London to the sprawling Brazilian city-states of Sao Paulo and Rio, metros are the new norm in global economic development, shaped by twenty-first-century forces of globalization, innovation, and cultural diversity."

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Published on Wednesday, March 11, 2009 in The Brookings Institution
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