Author Identifies A Back-To-The-Core Trend

<p>Seattle planner, architect and journalist Mark Hinshaw's new book, "True Urbanism," explains the theories behind why droves of people are abandoning the suburbs and flocking to dense, diverse urban environments.</p>
September 23, 2007, 7am PDT | Paul Shigley
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In an interview with California Planning & Development Report, Hinshaw explains his findings and theories, which conflict with the New Urbanist school.

"You have these very dense urban areas - they have parks and public spaces, they have a graciousness to the street and they take on a patina that comes over time. They have quirkiness and an unpredictability. People are not looking for sameness. They are looking for something different.

That's where I part company with the new urbanists. They are trying to create this out of whole cloth. I think you need an understory of things that give a place roots. I don't think you can invent that. I don't think that you can design it. It comes from the fact that a number of people get their hands on these places. That's where it becomes magic. You get these shared spaces, this collective attitude. It's not just you and a lot of other people living in an area. It's a shared history of the place. It's a richer array of things that results."

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Published on Tuesday, September 18, 2007 in California Planning & Development Report
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