U.S. Transportation Infrastructure Lacks Investment and Innovation

While other countries around the globe forge ahead with investment in transportation innovations such as road congestion pricing and high speed rail, the U.S. takes a wait and see attitude.

"The United States' relatively low investment in virtually all aspects of mobility-related infrastructure -- roads and bridges, airports, public transit, and railway systems -- is an "emerging crisis" that will compromise the ability of the nation's cities to compete globally, according to a new report co-published by the Urban Land Institute and Ernst Young.

Infrastructure 2007: A Global Perspective offers a comprehensive look at the status of current and planned infrastructure investment and development in a variety of categories in countries worldwide, with a particular focus on the U.S., China, Japan, India, and Europe. The first of its kind, the report discusses the evolving infrastructure market, including private and combination public-private systems for funding, construction, operations and management."

Full Story: U.S. lags way behind in transport infrastructure: Report

Comments

Comments

Maybe we plan smarter investment

Maybe our transportation experts plan to apply electronics to transportation. With electronics we can more than double capacity without building new infrastructure. 'Course we'll have to maintain the infrastructure we have.
MECapron

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