Reusing Regional Amusement Parks

Old amusement parks don't die, they just ... become housing.
August 23, 2006, 7am PDT | Chris Steins | @urbaninsight
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"Running a small, regional amusement park -- defined by the International Association of Amusement Parks and Attractions as one that draws fewer than 500,000 visitors a year -- is no easy task. Insurance costs are high. Competition from larger parks is intense. Attendance traditionally dips significantly once the summer ends. So it's no surprise that owners often sell their parks to developers willing to pay big money. The problem comes when land that included some amount of open space is swallowed by shopping centers, strip malls, and high-density subdivisions.

...Those concerned about this growing trend, a mixed crew consisting of nostalgia-driven amusement park junkies, neighbors concerned with traffic resulting from new businesses and housing, and open-space advocates, say there must be a better use of old amusement parks. Many of them are willing to fight for it -- with mixed results."

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Published on Monday, August 21, 2006 in Grist Magazine
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