Are Megacities Good?

We have entered the first 'urban century', and emerging megacities emphasize the divides between the wealthy and impoverished like never before.
December 31, 2004, 5am PST | Chris Steins | @urbaninsight
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"For the first time in human history, more people live in cities than do not," writes globalization scholar Deane Neubauer. Complex migratory patterns have led to a paradox within the world's most populous urban areas: While some residents live lavishly, reaping the benefits of global commerce, others are forced into impoverished conditions reminiscent of 19th-century industrialization. China, for instance, has seen "the greatest migration in the history of the world," as over 150 million rural poor have relocated to large cities. The lure of globalizing urban industries has resulted in an unprecedented agricultural labor shortage in China. National governments, surprised by the rapid pace of urbanization, are ill-equipped to cope with the enormous challenges.

Thanks to Chris Steins

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Published on Wednesday, October 26, 2005 in Yale Center For The Study Of Globalization
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