Work Here, But Go Live Someplace Else

The official economic development policy in many Washington, D.C. suburbs is to attract new jobs -- but not allow enough housing for all the workers.

Local governments in the Washington metro area want the tax revenue that new businesses bring, but not the costs that workers and their families incur as residents. Instead, places like Montgomery County approve enough commercial and retail space for 40,000 workers--but only allow for less than 15,000 new homes to be built. The result? Inefficient land use and high housing prices, forcing commuters to live farther and farther away to afford a place to live.

Thanks to Deborah Myerson

Full Story: Space for Employers, Not for Homes

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