Should Car Sharing Replace Public Transit?

The U.S. could provide energy efficient cars for all travel by low-income transit riders for less than the cost of transit subsidies.
July 8, 2004, 5am PDT | Chris Steins | @urbaninsight
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It would cost less than $10 billion to provide cars for all the transit riders who don't have access to them, compared with annual spending of about $25 billion on transit subsidies. A commercial model for such a program already exists. Around the world, anti-automobile activists have stablished "car-share" networks that allow people to have access to cars without having to own them. For example, "Flex-Car" in Portland provides cars for less than $0.30 per vehicle mile--a rate that includes the car, insurance, service, and fuel. Today, car-sharing is seen as a substitute for car ownership. But its larger market may be to replace public transit systems.

Thanks to Chris Steins

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Published on Tuesday, July 6, 2004 in Heartland Institute
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