The Silent Edge

Gertrude Jekyll's "wide wood path" informs a new burial ground at historic Mount Auburn Cemetery.
May 26, 2004, 12pm PDT | Abhijeet Chavan
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Maple Avenue is deceptively simple; that's its beauty. Sheltered by a deciduous canopy, enclosed by groves of redbud and birch, and edged by assorted ground covers, what appears to be a curved wooded path at the edge of a cemetery is itself a burial ground. Beneath this 300-foot-long arc of immaculate turf are more than 200 concrete lawn crypts, stacked two and three deep and laid lengthwise, end-to-end, in three parallel rows. When remains are to be interred, a section of turf is removed and a casket lowered into a crypt. Then the grass is restored, and the person is memorialized on one of the four granite columns at the path's edge or on a granite bench.

Thanks to Jeffrey Lofton, APR

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Published on Tuesday, May 25, 2004 in American Society Of Landscape Architects
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