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Biology Professor Paul Ehrlich's 1968 book, "The Population Bomb," took America and the world by storm. The apocalyptic vision based of population outgrowing its resources appeared to make inherent sense.
17 min ago   The New York Times - Retro Report
Blog Post
How do you collect public comments on a web-based PDF planning document? It should be simple. But it isn't. Blog Post
15 hours ago   By Chris Steins
The writing is on the wall for what's left of the coal industry.
16 hours ago   Fusion
It was a beautiful weekend to hit the streets of Pittsburgh—and many did, for the Open Streets Pittsburgh event and the debut of Pittsburgh Bike Share.
17 hours ago   Pittsburg Post-Gazette
We're all familiar with the now ubiquitous Kickstarter campaigns, but what about some other tools to help crowdfund local retail and development?
18 hours ago   Community Builders
Improvements funded by the developer of the 73-story Wilshire Grand project will make Downtown Los Angeles' main thoroughfare a better place to walk, bike, and use public transit.
19 hours ago   Urbanize LA
If Lee has his way, San Francisco will join other cities like New York, Chicago, and Washington, D.C. by employing speed cameras to issue citations to offending motorists in school zones. But first he needs to find a legislator to draft a bill.
20 hours ago   San Francisco Chronicle
In exchange for the approval to build One Vanderbilt, a 63-story office tower adjacent to Grand Central Terminal, the developer will give the MTA $220 million for upgrades to entrances of the Metro-North Railroad and the terminal's subway entrances.
21 hours ago   The New York Times - N.Y. / Region
A new study indicates that the safest urban streets have lanes that measure 10-10.5 feet wide. Narrower and wider lanes have higher crash frequencies, and wider lanes have higher crash severity.
22 hours ago   Streetsblog USA
Blog Post
Common planning practices create automobile-dependent communities where driving is convenient and other forms of travel are inefficient. It's time to recognize the value of transportation diversity. Blog Post
23 hours ago   By Todd Litman
According to an ACEEE report, Boston currently leads the way, with New York, Washington, DC, and San Francisco not far behind. Los Angeles, Washington, and Chicago show the most improvement since 2013.
Yesterday   American Council for an Energy-Efficient Economy