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A developer is claiming that the New Jersey borough of Upper Saddle River violated its "civil rights" to provide housing in a New Jersey community.
8 hours ago   The Record
Researchers from the University of Texas identified the places in Dallas that suffer a lack of adequate transit service. Leading the list: Far North Dallas.
9 hours ago   The Dallas Morning News
One of Seattle's most recognizable locations began work on sweeping changes on June 24, 2015.
10 hours ago   The Urbanist
The San Antonio Missions—five frontier missions that include The Alamo—were named among a group of new World Heritage Sites.
11 hours ago   UNESCO
An op-ed by Jostein Solheim, CEO of Ben & Jerry's, supports the second phase of greenhouse gas emissions and fuel efficiency standards for medium- and heavy-duty engines and vehicles that would become effective 2018.
12 hours ago   The Guardian
When his father was governor, California was awash in federal highway dollars. Now Jerry Brown's administration contemplates a risky tax hike, juggling the need for road improvements with a clean, transit-oriented agenda.
13 hours ago   Los Angeles Times
In its first comprehensive plan since the 1960s, Canton, Ohio, is setting a bold new course that could influence planning in hundreds of small and mid-sized American cities with weak real estate markets.
14 hours ago   The Canton Repository
For a long time, surface parking lots blanketed Maryland's Montgomery County. Developers and county officials now prioritize mixed-use infill with parking concealed underground.
15 hours ago   WAMU
Architecture Critic Blair Kamin wants more from Make Way for People, Chicago Mayor Rahm Emanuel's placemaking program, and finds faults with the Lincoln Hub as an example of tactical urbanism.
16 hours ago   Chicago Tribune
In a civic exercise only possible in Pittsburgh, residents voted online in resounding support of keeping the color scheme of the city's famous Three Sisters Bridges.
17 hours ago   Pittsburg Post-Gazette
Blog Post
Continuing to heap praise onto James Corner and his firm, Field Operations, may seem like an exercise in redundancy at this point. But there is little doubt that all of the attention is good for landscape architects—and for cities. Blog Post
Yesterday   By Mark Hough