Rankings from the International Association of Public Transport have Tokyo on top, followed by Beijing and Shanghai. New York comes in seventh.
Nov 11, 2015   Citymetric
As Mexico City continues to add population, issues of sprawl, inequality, and water infrastructure remain challenges in the growing megalopolis.
Nov 5, 2015   Inverse
A city infamous for a broken and largely informal system of public transit is implementing a massive overhaul of its bus system. High capacity bus rapid transit will run at the center of the new system.
Oct 30, 2015   Los Angeles Times
A team of designers will convert one Mexico City's most dangerous highways into an urban oasis.
Sep 10, 2015   ASLA's The Dirt blog
Instead of building a wall separating the United States and Mexico, officials from both countries celebrated the opening on Tuesday of the West Rail Bypass International Bridge.
Aug 29, 2015   USA Today
Governing details a historic new infrastructure addition across the Rio Grande in Texas. The railroad crossing required a massive coordinated effort—just on the U.S. side of the border.
Apr 9, 2015   Governing
Scientists from the Santa Fe Institute have discovered basic patterns underlying the way cities have always grown. The mechanics of "urban scaling" may have something fundamental to tell us about how large settlements evolve.
Mar 1, 2015   Christian Science Monitor
National Geographic details the effects of the "Minute 319" agreement that will return water to the Colorado River Delta.
Dec 19, 2014   National Geographic
Mexico's planned high-speed rail project looked like tit was full speed ahead until the country rescinded the original construction contract, awarded to the China Railway Construction Corp. A new round of bids is expected soon.
Dec 3, 2014   Reuters
A report released last week by Cushman & Wakefield has won a lot of attention from media outlets covering large-scale development market trends. Among the report's findings: growing cities need to better support transit-oriented development.
Oct 8, 2014   Globe St.
The Mexican government built houses for five million citizens in the last decade, only to see those houses abandoned en masse after sprawling patterns out stretched demand.
Sep 10, 2014   The New York Times