Land Use

Fayetteville, Arkansas, home to the University of Arkansas and neighbor to Bentonville, home of Walmart, has taken a national leadership role in parking policy by ending minimum parking requirements for non-residential uses.
13 hours ago   Fayetteville Flyer
The swift rejection of a proposal to upzone residential neighborhoods in Seattle inspired The Urbanist to evaluate the lessons of the episode. One takeaway: don't demonize single-family homeowners.
Aug 12, 2015   The Urbanist
Much to the chagrin of Americans of conservative political stripes, the United Nations has adopted a set sustainable development goals. According to a recent op-ed, however, the left also has reason to fault the UN's efforts.
Aug 10, 2015   Jacobin
A suburb of Cincinnati provides evidence of renewed demand for master planned communities.
Aug 10, 2015   Cincinnati Business Courier
Details are scarce—but reports are that Frank Gehry has been working behind the scenes to create a new vision for the Los Angeles River.
Aug 9, 2015   Los Angeles Times
Seattle's recent Housing and Livability Agenda (HALA) recommendations have created a sensational dialogue about zoning, affordability and neighborhood change. Chuck Wolfe explains how this may create an unprecedented basis for consensus in the city.
Aug 9, 2015   Crosscut
A term you need to know.
Aug 8, 2015   New York Magazine
The Prospect North Partnership intends to build a fully integrated, resource-efficient neighborhood in a prime yet underdeveloped location.
Aug 8, 2015   MinnPost
According to a new rule, developers building over known faults will need to drill or take samples to find the rift's exact position. While it slows down construction, the measure might prevent catastrophic future quake damage.
Aug 7, 2015   KPCC
Jarrett Walker outlines the conditions under which transit serves the greatest number of travelers. Maximizing ridership, he argues, requires thinking like a business and catering to demand.
Aug 7, 2015   Human Transit
Long stretches of Connecticut's "lifeblood" shoreline rail line lie in the path of rising seas and future floods. While moving the tracks further inland is prohibitively expensive, a resilience plan is still needed.
Aug 7, 2015   The Connecticut Mirror