Landscape Architecture

As the redesign for LOVE Park begins, Ashley Hahn reminds us of the park's role in supporting and maintaining civic life in the city of brotherly love.
Yesterday   PlanPhilly
Back when Vancouver was first discussing the concept of laneway housing as part of the EcoDensity Initiative in 2006-2008, we nick-named it "hidden density" because it didn't significantly change the way single-detached housing blocks looked from the street. We did so, recognizing that the word hidden is a relative term.  Opinion
Nov 12, 2010   By Brent Toderian
A proposal for a "High Line"-like park in Jersey City has some locals deeply concerned about the project's large price tag.
Nov 12, 2010   The New York Times
The City of New York has announced plans to allow restaurants to edge into the street to use parking spots for outdoor seating and patios.
Nov 11, 2010   Grist
Land use lawyer Keith Sugar makes the case that while NIMBYs are often acting on behalf of their own parochial interests, they serve a beneficial role as a valuable corrective to the land use planning process. Exclusive
Nov 11, 2010  By Keith Sugar
Charles Waldheim examines the current trend's roots in design and architectural history and how it might alter city form.
Nov 9, 2010   Places
New designs for the surrounding park offer a chance at a brighter future for the Eero Saarinen-designed Gateway Arch in St. Louis.
Oct 28, 2010   Architectural Record
For more than 40 years, the city of Philadelphia has had its sights set on transforming the Delaware Riverfront, but few plans have taken hold and little transformation has actually occurred. A new master plan could finally make it happen.
Oct 21, 2010   The Philadelphia Inquirer
<em>The American Society of Landscape Architects</em> talks with landscape architect Michael Van Valkenburgh about "ecological urbanism" and the evolving role of landscape architecture in cities.
Oct 19, 2010   ASLA
A suburb of Tel Aviv is trying to revive itself by becoming an arts destination.
Oct 18, 2010   Los Angeles Times
Trails and walking paths are commonly built in suburban areas. But their mere presence doesn't automatically mean they'll be used, according to a new study.
Oct 15, 2010   Miller-McCune