Landscape Architecture

June 24, 2008, 6am PDT
<p>Despite predictions that the city was dying, St. Louis has just won an "All-America City" award. Neal Peirce looks at how the city turned itself around.</p>
The Washington Post Writers Group
June 21, 2008, 9am PDT
<p>This commentary from the <em>Los Angeles Times</em> calls for creation of a central park for the city, made by putting a "cap" over a section of freeway.</p>
The Los Angeles Times
June 12, 2008, 8am PDT
<p>A report announced by Mayor Michael Nutter estimates that Philadelphia's park system has a combined economic value of $1.9 billion in services, income and taxes to the city.</p>
The Philadelphia Inquirer
June 8, 2008, 5am PDT
<p>A city councilwoman in Galt, south of Sacramento, is cited for violating city code rules on watering. That's despite the fact that the City Council had urged the public to water and care for lawns at foreclosed homes.</p>
Lodi News-Sentinel
June 4, 2008, 2pm PDT
<p>Canton, Ohio residents and property owners who don't pay close enough attention to their lawns could face jail time. A new law would apply to repeat offenders and to lawns and weeds growing higher than eight inches.</p>
Canton Repository
Blog post
June 2, 2008, 5pm PDT

My graduate school education left me with a lot of general ideas and a handful of specific ones. One that stuck with me is a concept from landscape architecture: the desire path. Technically, the term means a path where there isn't supposed to be one, a trail of wear and tear that wasn't planned.

Tim Halbur
Blog post
May 28, 2008, 11am PDT

In his annual tour-de-force presentation on the state of Vancouver's housing market recently, marketing guru Bob Rennie (referred to often as Canada's "condo king", and thus often accused of having a vested interest in a continued strong market for condos here in Vancouver) had some new, controversial points that are still being debated locally. Perhaps the most provocative was his call to action for the development industry to get back into building housing that is more affordable to ordinary Vancouverites (as opposed to being geared to the international market - his comment was that we know how to serve that world market, now we need to show that we can serve the local market better, or words to that effect). Given that he included details like "capping developer profit at 10%", I found his comments pretty brave in front of an audience of 700+ developers and clients.

Brent Toderian
May 27, 2008, 12pm PDT
<p>The installation of a green roof and solar array on the rooftop of the new WGBH building in Boston is captured on video.</p>
The Boston Globe
May 25, 2008, 5am PDT
<p>San Francisco Mayor Gavin Newsom is considering a plan to temporarily close down certain streets to car traffic, creating public space for pedestrians -- similar to the successful Ciclovia that takes place weekly in Bogota, Colombia.</p>
The Examiner
May 23, 2008, 10am PDT
<p>A national survey shows that despite the depression in the housing market, landscape architects across the U.S. continue to get work.</p>
Daily Journal of Commerce, Portland, OR
May 16, 2008, 10am PDT
<p>A dazzling wildflower season spells trouble for master-planned communities across the West.</p>
The Next American City
Blog post
May 15, 2008, 4pm PDT

I believe it's very likely that within a few years, planning departments will be using blogs, and perhaps other social networking site options, as approaches to public input on planning policy or development applications.

Perhaps some are doing it already?

Brent Toderian
May 13, 2008, 8am PDT
<p>Pubilc art should be guided by public input, according to this commentary.</p>
The Guardian
May 8, 2008, 1pm PDT
<p>What do you do when 96 football fields worth of space opens up in a major metro area?</p>
The Los Angeles Times
May 2, 2008, 9am PDT
<p>For thousands of years, fountains always featured a water basin. Then landscape architect Peter Walker designed Harvard University's Tanner Fountain, and a revolutionary new idea was born.</p>
The Chronicle of Higher Education
April 30, 2008, 12pm PDT
<p>While cities are focused on promoting green 'buildings', planners and landscape architects need to advocate more green city planning.</p>
BBC News
Blog post
April 28, 2008, 2pm PDT

One of the many signs that green development and design is reaching a tipping point toward becoming business-as-usual, is the quantity of articles and writings on the subject in what might be considered "mainstream" land development publications. Case-in-point is the current Issue of Urban Land, the Green issue. This attention is a good thing, despite the growing need to ensure that developments that play the green card, truly do walk the talk. 

Brent Toderian
April 27, 2008, 1pm PDT
<p>A former bus and rail yard in park-poor South Los Angeles will be converted into an "urban wetland park".</p>
The Los Angeles Times
April 27, 2008, 5am PDT
<p>Vacant lots and underutilized dirt patches are the the romping grounds of a new breed of activists. Known as "guerrilla gardeners", groups of people all over the world are reclaiming their cities' public spaces and landscapes by planting seeds.</p>
The Guardian
April 24, 2008, 5am PDT
<p>Tacoma, Washington, could become a walkable city, according to Danish architect Lars Genzoe.</p>
The News Tribune