Infrastructure

The pressures on water supply are growing at the same time that water quality is becoming more expensive and more difficult to maintain. A recent article examines the challenges in the farm state of Nebraska.
7 hours ago   Governing
Officials in Washington tend to agree that infrastructure problems are in dire need of attention. But amid turbulent economic times, will those problems get that attention?
Apr 9, 2011   National Journal
The tiny mideast country of Qatar is a new hotbed of infrastructure activity and foreign investment, leading some to suggest that it will be the next place to take off in the region.
Apr 9, 2011   CNBC
Climate change is expected to create major shifts in the amount of water and rainfall in cities in the near future. A recent symposium in Philadelphia on urban water delved into this emerging problem.
Apr 8, 2011   The Philadelphia Inquirer
Canadian cities are facing major backlogs in terms of maintaining and updating infrastructure. Putting off the work is expected to cost cities billions.
Apr 8, 2011   The Vancouver Sun
A "crazy idea" to remove an inner city freeway in Seoul, South Korea turned to reality. This piece tells the story about how this unlikely event came to be.
Apr 8, 2011   Grist
Skyways in Minneapolis and St. Paul have been a major part of the two cities downtowns for years, but are also blamed for killing their streetlife. A new video competition challenged filmmakers to explore that dichotomy.
Apr 7, 2011   MinnPost
According to Joe Peach of <em>This Big City</em>, London public transit finally got something right with its cycle hire scheme, now known as "Boris Bikes."
Apr 7, 2011   This Big City
Jarrett Walker of Human Transit writes that car-pool rules need to be updated to effectively deal with congestion on the country's highways.
Apr 7, 2011   Human Transit
The concept of "traffic calming," in which urban streets are altered in order to make them feel slower for drivers is discussed in this video from Street Films.
Apr 7, 2011   StreetFilms.org
A small town in Michigan created a network of underground pipes to divert waste heat from its power plant to downtown streets and sidewalks. Today, the community benefits from sidewalks that remain clear and dry no matter how cold it gets.
Apr 6, 2011   Metropolis Magazine