History / Preservation

Researchers at the Institute for Quality Communities at the University of Oklahoma prepared a set of images to show the indelible impact of mid-20th century urban renewal on Midwestern cities.
3 days ago   Institute for Quality Communities
New Jersey School of Architecture Director Darius Sollohub writes that transportation planners and engineers should consider what their infrastructure designs will say to today's users and future generations in an essay in InTransition magazine.
Sep 30, 2014   InTransition Magazine
Eleri Harris offers a graphic account of the historic planning and design of Canberra, Australia—designed and planned by Americans, Walter Burley Griffen and Marion Mahony Griffin.
Sep 28, 2014   Medium
From the never built files (except this time for good reason): A proposal not endorsed during a 19070s expansion plan for the Getty Villa in the Pacific Palisades was a recreation of Mount Vesuvius.
Sep 26, 2014   ARTINFO
In his third "place-decoding" essay from France, Chuck Wolfe recalls all that we can learn from walking between settled places.
Sep 25, 2014   The Huffington Post
What's your elevator pitch on why placemaking matters? Here's a couple rounded up by Hazel Borys, and some numbers that help refine their message.
Sep 16, 2014   PlaceShakers
Henry Louis Gates Jr. of Harvard University and The Root tells of the Virginia outpost that helped inspire the artists of the Harlem Renaissance of the 1920s.
Sep 16, 2014   The Root
It’s one of those no-win debates, but still a useful one. Opinion
Sep 15, 2014   By Dean Saitta
In his second Huffington Post article on "place-decoding," Chuck Wolfe argues for considered attention to enhancing people's abilities to discern the city around them.
Sep 13, 2014   The Huffington Post
Outcry over the potential redevelopment of RCA Studio A in Nashville is raising tough questions about the conflicting dynamics of property rights and cultural heritage.
Sep 12, 2014   Aljazeera America
Famous examples of aging architecture styles, such as brutalism, are in need of renovations, sometimes requiring the public to pay the bill. But brutalist buildings are often obdurate and hard to adapt and reuse.
Sep 9, 2014   Architectural Record