History / Preservation

Blog post
October 20, 2014, 5am PDT
Does a 100-year-old tent colony located on a 40-acre piece of remote, sunbaked and windswept prairie have anything to teach us about intercultural urban planning and design?
Dean Saitta
October 9, 2014, 10am PDT
In his fourth "place-decoding" essay from France, Chuck Wolfe illustrates how a traditional placemaking intervention is especially powerful when underlying urban fundamentals align.
Huffington Post
October 6, 2014, 1pm PDT
The quest to preserve the masterpieces of modern architecture can also provide a model for preserving lesser-known construction from the 20th century. An initiative of the Getty Conservation Institute would achieve both goals.
Los Angeles Times
October 6, 2014, 10am PDT
Emerging from a half century of dictatorship, can Myanmar's principal city be a model of sustainable, democratic development?
Places Journal
October 3, 2014, 9am PDT
One possible frame though which to consider the ongoing evolution of cities like San Francisco: the measures (sometimes) taken to preserve the historic fabric of the city.
Socket Site
October 1, 2014, 7am PDT
Greek orators, current solution-based efforts, and 25 photographs remind us of the central role of human opportunity in the urban environment.
The Huffington Post
September 30, 2014, 2pm PDT
New Jersey School of Architecture Director Darius Sollohub writes that transportation planners and engineers should consider what their infrastructure designs will say to today's users and future generations in an essay in InTransition magazine.
InTransition Magazine
September 28, 2014, 1pm PDT
Eleri Harris offers a graphic account of the historic planning and design of Canberra, Australia—designed and planned by Americans, Walter Burley Griffen and Marion Mahony Griffin.
September 26, 2014, 6am PDT
From the never built files (except this time for good reason): A proposal not endorsed during a 19070s expansion plan for the Getty Villa in the Pacific Palisades was a recreation of Mount Vesuvius.
September 25, 2014, 5am PDT
In his third "place-decoding" essay from France, Chuck Wolfe recalls all that we can learn from walking between settled places.
The Huffington Post
September 16, 2014, 11am PDT
What's your elevator pitch on why placemaking matters? Here's a couple rounded up by Hazel Borys, and some numbers that help refine their message.
September 16, 2014, 9am PDT
Henry Louis Gates Jr. of Harvard University and The Root tells of the Virginia outpost that helped inspire the artists of the Harlem Renaissance of the 1920s.
The Root
Blog post
September 15, 2014, 8am PDT
Is there a sweet spot where architectural boldness and innovation meet sensitivity to local context, history, and culture?
Dean Saitta
September 13, 2014, 11am PDT
In his second Huffington Post article on "place-decoding," Chuck Wolfe argues for considered attention to enhancing people's abilities to discern the city around them.
The Huffington Post
September 12, 2014, 12pm PDT
Outcry over the potential redevelopment of RCA Studio A in Nashville is raising tough questions about the conflicting dynamics of property rights and cultural heritage.
Aljazeera America
September 9, 2014, 11am PDT
Famous examples of aging architecture styles, such as brutalism, are in need of renovations, sometimes requiring the public to pay the bill. But brutalist buildings are often obdurate and hard to adapt and reuse.
Architectural Record
September 8, 2014, 8am PDT
Good design impacts tourism, jobs, property values and quality of life. What can we do to bring good design to small towns and rural communities? Here are a few good tips and inspiring examples.
September 7, 2014, 7am PDT
A recent article takes a controversial stance contrary to the argument of Jane Jacobs that old buildings equal affordable, diverse neighborhoods.
Market Urbanism
September 5, 2014, 9am PDT
Chuck Wolfe champions the role of France's attachment to place as a laboratory for decoding the essential elements of urbanism.
The Huffington Post
September 3, 2014, 11am PDT
Most North American urbanists turn to Europe for inspiration and direction. Some of that brilliance, Ben Brown reminds us, is due to time and distance.