Government / Politics

Six years after one of the worst environmental disasters in U.S. history, the EPA adopted a rule to regulate a byproduct of coal power plants. The new regulation puts coal ash in the same category as household garbage, disappointing many activists.
15 hours ago   EPA Connect
The city of Rome is looking for a private sponsor to buy advertising rights on its historic Colosseum. The $33 million contract would pay for renovation on the site.
Aug 20, 2010   Bloomberg
Various rules and regulations control the form of today's cities. This info graphic and article from <em>re:place</em> looks at how those systems control the urban environment and how they compare.
Aug 20, 2010   re:place
<em>The City Fix</em> looks at a new report that focuses on how Brazil can create a long-term benefit from the billions its investing in the 2014 World Cup.
Aug 20, 2010   The City Fix
With her Foodprint project, Nicola Twilley wondered what one could learn about a city by looking at it through the lens of food. In this piece on <em>Urban Omnibus</em> she shares what she's learned.
Aug 19, 2010   Urban Omnibus
By expanding its car-sharing requirements on new non-residential buildings, the city of San Francisco is looking to make car-sharing more viable and accessible in the transit-friendly city.
Aug 19, 2010   San Francisco Chronicle
The James River runs right through downtown Richmond, Virginia. But with few public access points, the river is a largely ignored part of the urban realm.
Aug 19, 2010   Richmond Times-Dispatch
The City of Los Angeles Planning Commission has reintroduced sweeping reform of the zoning codes in an effort to streamline planning processes. "This marks the first overhaul of codes since their last revision in 1946," said City Planner Alan Bell.
Aug 19, 2010   Architects Newspaper
The rise of megacities and innovation hubs is leading to a balance shift that will make cities, not nations, the most powerful drivers in the world economy, according to Parag Khanna.
Aug 19, 2010   Foreign Policy
Researchers estimate that roughly three-quarters of the oil spilled into the Gulf of Mexico is still dangerously concentrated in the water, a claim that disputes official word from the government that much of the oil has been safely dispersed.
Aug 18, 2010   The Wall Street Journal
This piece from <em>The Freeman</em> looks at the debate over sprawl and whether free market economics encourage it or offer a solution.
Aug 18, 2010   The Freeman