Europe

With about 353 tourists per resident in the historic city center of Venice, many residents are fleeing the crowds and moving onto the mainland, making the city a "monument-attraction," rather than a viable living space.
3 days ago   Global Site Plans
The small town of Perugia, Italy has left its traffic worries behind by implementing various driving restrictions and transportation solutions like escalators and a "minimetro".
Feb 3, 2011   National Geographic
Beneath Paris is an underground network of tunnels and quarries, long closed to the public. <em>National Geographic</em> takes a tour of this forbidden part of the city, where urban explorers keep tradition alive.
Feb 3, 2011   National Geographic
Many European cities are reversing decades-long trends of accommodating automobiles and are eliminating parking and putting tougher regulations in place, according to a new report.
Jan 21, 2011   New Urban News Network
Rome has instituted a new tax on tourists aimed at building a fund to restore its crumbling infrastructure. But some worry it will drive tourists away.
Jan 18, 2011   Der Spiegel
Jonna McKone of TheCityFix looks at Copenhagen's recently added rail cars that are specifically for bicyclists and other passengers with special needs.
Jan 7, 2011   TheCityFix
An air hangar in Germany has been converted into a massive waterpark, which some see as the possible beginning of a trend in adaptive reuse of these types of facilities.
Dec 30, 2010   Air & Space
Urban explorer dsankt offers an in-depth look inside abandoned sections of the Metro system of Paris.
Dec 28, 2010   Sleepy City
Artists are flocking to a town in Turkey that promises "authentic village life." The architect behind the plan says that the project has attracted creatives who "miss natural and pure human relations."
Dec 22, 2010   Daily News & Economic Review
With tens of thousands of unoccupied housing units on the market, the full impact of "problematic" real estate investments on the country's economy remains to be seen.
Dec 21, 2010   The New York Times
Russian cities will be connected by high speed rail by the time the country hosts the 2018 World Cup, according to Prime Minister Vladimir Putin.
Dec 18, 2010   Rianovosti