Energy

In this radio report on the use of the expensive, controversial strategy of desalination to meet California's water needs in an epic drought, KQED's science reporter speaks with the mayor of Carmel, a V.P. of Poseidon Water, and an environmentalist.
17 hours ago   NPR-Morning Edition
The Wall Street Journal's senior energy reporter, Russell Gold, is interviewed on NPR about the February 16 derailment and explosion in West Virginia of an oil-train hauling 109 tanker cars of Bakken crude from North Dakota.
Mar 6, 2015   NPR
It might be hard to believe if you're in Boston right now, but the entire West Coast is suffering a poorly timed dearth of snow, a critical source of drinking water and hydroelectric capacity for the region.
Mar 5, 2015   The Bellingham Herald
The Wall Street Journal examines desalination efforts on the Central and South Coasts, starting with the reactivation of a Santa Barbara plant. Notwithstanding criticisms on costs and environmental damage, eight plants have been built since 2006.
Mar 4, 2015   The Wall Street Journal
California's cap-and-trade market saw its largest carbon sale, $1.02 billion, thanks to millions of motorists now paying about a dime a gallon for the right to emit carbon for the first time since the program began in November 2012.
Mar 3, 2015   The Sacramento Bee
The rise of shale oil in Alberta over the past decade has made Calgary one of the most vibrant cities on the continent. But with oil slumping around $50 per barrel, the fortunes of an industry town look less rosy.
Feb 28, 2015   The Wall Street Journal
Within hours of receiving the bipartisan bill on Tuesday to authorize the Keystone XL pipeline, President Obama made good on his promise to veto it. The legislation would have short-circuited the approval process, which upset the president.
Feb 25, 2015   The Hill
Since the July 2013 derailment and explosion of an oil train in Lac-Mégantic, Quebec* killed 47, Canada has contributed C$155 million toward the rebuilding effort because the railroad's insurance was insufficient.
Feb 24, 2015   The Wall Street Journal - Business
Rapid urbanization and climate change will make it harder for cities to provide crucial resources for their citizens. In this article, Arup consultants Amy Leitch and Laura Frost examine how the built environment can fill this emerging need.
Feb 24, 2015   Arup Connect
With SUV sales up, car sales down, and mileage driven up, the effects of lower gas prices could soon extend to land use, making suburban and exurban commuting more affordable. Economists have a term for these effects: demand response.
Feb 24, 2015   The Wall Street Journal - The Outlook
A new study aims to broaden the understanding of an increasing number of human-caused earthquakes. Fracking might not be entirely to blame.
Feb 22, 2015   Pacific Standard