The Next Frontier for Historic Preservation: The Moon

Writing in the New York Times, Kenneth Chang explores the challenges of Historic Preservation in an unlikely location, the surface of the moon.

For most of the last decade Beth L. O'Leary, a professor of anthropology at New Mexico State University, and her students have been seeking formal protections for the artifacts remaining on the Moon from the Apollo 11 and Apollo 17 missions.

The States of California and New Mexico have now officially listed the areas as Historical Resources. More crucially, NASA recently joined the effort by issuing a series of recommendations to protect the landing sites and the remaining artifacts.

Unfortunately, those official actions have no legal force. To protect the items from future visitors, Robert Kelso, manager of lunar commercial services at NASA's Johnson Space Center in Houston, is "hoping that whether it's an international team or a commercial team, they would honor and recognize the value of these sites and honor these recommendations."

Full Story: To Preserve History on the Moon, Visitors Are Asked to Tread Lightly

Comments

Comments

What?

Don't we have better things to concern ourselves with here on Earth?

Preserving the moon.

Next stop for Agenda 21: taking over the mooooooooon!

Best,

D

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