Michael Lewyn's blog

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What Density-Phobia Gets Wrong

In her article, "What Champions of Urban Density Get Wrong," the Philadelphia Inquirer's Inga Saffron critiques attempts to increase urban population. This post responds to her work.
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What Property Professors Are Writing About

A recent property professors' conference discussed a variety of issues of possible interest to planners including tightened home lending standards, municipal policies affecting the homeless, the Fair Housing Act, and inclusionary zoning.
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Suburban Multifamily: Smart Growth or Smart Sprawl?

In suburbia, the line between smart growth and conventional sprawl is sometimes a blurry one.
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Supply and Demand Denialism

Some progressives deny that the law of supply and demand applies to housing.
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More Sensationalism About Gentrification

Governing's recent study of gentrification systematically exaggerates gentrification in a variety of ways.
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High-Rises and Streetlife

The common claim that "high-rises kill streetlife" is often incorrect.
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Atlas Sprawled

One obstacle to laissez-faire capitalism is capitalists' ability to use government to favor one competitor over another; the history of American street design provides an example.
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Is Mismanagement the Cause of Legacy Cities' Decline?

One common argument against attempts to control sprawl near declining cities is that the problem is the fault of mismanaged city government.
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The Economist and Suburbia: A Fistful of Myths

A recent set of articles in the Economist argued that the continued spread of suburbia was inevitable and perhaps desirable. But the article's arguments are not always applicable to North America.
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Secrets of Congestion-Busting Cities

Only nine regions experienced reduced traffic congestion between 1991 and 2011. What do they have in common?

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