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A Special Focus on Planning for Healthy Schools

SAGE has provided free access to material from the Journal of Planning Education and Research's focus issue on Healthy Schools. Click here for the links and synopses. Follow us on Twitter @JPER7 & on Facebook (https://www.facebook.com/JPERPlanning)

Evaluating the Impact of Conservation Subdivision Implementation

Aslıgül Göçmen examines the environmental impact of conservation subdivision design.

Streetcars and Recovery

A study of streetcar-adjacent development patterns in New Orleans following Hurricane Katrina provides lessons for the many U.S. cities building and planning new streetcar lines.

Traversing the Border: Planning with Transnational Communities

Transnational communities transcend borders in order to act collectively, despite geographic, economic and political challenges. A new paper examines how community-based planning is scaled up and embedded in transnational processes and relationships.

JPER’s Top Cited Articles: The Debate over Communicative Planning

JPER has existed since the early 1980s but 4 of the top 5 articles date from the mid-1990s to the early 2000s and focus on the theory behind collaboration and communication in planning.

How the U.S. Became a Unique "Nation of Homezoners”

Exceptionalism is a word often associated with the U.S., most often with foreign policy. Sonia Hirt of VPI argues that since its inception American zoning has also taken a unique form compared to European counterparts.

How a Railway Near the Bastille Revolutionized How We Think About Obsolete Infrastructure

Joseph Heathcott presents a historical narrative of the decline, revitalization, and gentrification of the Parisian neighborhood surrounding the Promenade Plantée and Viaduct des Arts, the pioneering repurposing of obsolete urban infrastructure.

LEED-ND Projects Reduce Driving, But Is There a Simpler Way to Measure Success?

New research by Ewing et al finds that vehicle miles traveled in LEED-ND projects may be as much as 60% lower than regional averages. However, objective models of transportation outcomes may prove more efficient than LEED’s points-based system.