December 31, 2011, 1pm PST
Chuck Wolfe analyzes his 2011 articles which appeared on Planetizen and in other sources, and derives his urbanist trends to watch for in 2012.
November 28, 2011, 2pm PST
Faced with climate change and poverty, Africans are focusing on a new farming frontier: the cities.
November 22, 2011, 12pm PST
An interview with Nancy Odendaal, who is spearheading an effort by the Association of African Planning Schools to reform planning education across the continent.
The Atlantic Cities
November 17, 2011, 2pm PST
Lisa Findley & Liz Ogbu explain how architecture and urban planning were critical to apartheid in South Africa and how Le Corbusier and Ebenezer Howard influenced the racial segregation practice.
Design Observer
October 28, 2011, 12pm PDT
Drawing from lessons learned by a Seattle-based economic development organization working in Africa, Chuck Wolfe notes that "[s]ometimes, finding a way to keep a meaningful rural existence trumps city life."
October 28, 2011, 7am PDT
Halloween may mark the world reaching 7 billion. Population author Vanessa Baird looks beyond the number into both fertility and consumption rates, showing why it is a mistake to get caught up with the increase in population rather than consumption.
The Guardian - U.K.
September 27, 2011, 1pm PDT
Prof. Suzanne Preston Blier of Harvard unearths the ancient plans of Yoruban towns, which were laid out as early as 350 BCE.
ASLA's The Dirt blog
September 14, 2011, 5am PDT
Kigali, Rwanda's capital city, is beginning to embrace an urban transect-based plan as a solution for its recent population growth and rapidly evolving economy.
World Architecture News
September 10, 2011, 9am PDT
A survey of over 8,000 commuters in 20 cities across 6 continents yields an alarming result. By and large, commuters in emerging economies face traffic conditions that are far worse than those who live in the U.S. and Europe.
The Infrastructurist
September 2, 2011, 9am PDT
With high scores in five broad categories, Melbourne, Australia received the highest spot in livability rankings from The Economist's research unit.
August 30, 2011, 1pm PDT
New government efforts in South Africa are trying to improve mobility for those who rely on public transportation, walking and biking.
This Big City
August 13, 2011, 9am PDT
The Greater Amman Municipality (GAM) may no longer be pursuing a bus rapid transit (BRT) system because of opposition from within government circles.
August 10, 2011, 10am PDT
Ethiopia is planning to construct a large hydroelectric dam on the Nile River to supply power for itself and neighboring countries.
National Geographic
July 26, 2011, 8am PDT
One year after it hosted the World Cup, South Africa is looking at empty and expensive stadia and a persistent debt that's causing some to regret hosting the soccer tournament.
The New York Times Magazine
June 29, 2011, 10am PDT
In Widou, an area in the Ferlo region of northern Senegal, the people are working to plant 390,000 trees before the end of July as a part of a multi-state program to decrease desertification.
June 23, 2011, 5am PDT
Three Chinese companies are building a 31-mile highway to the Kenyan capital of Nairobi. It's a move locals see as an effort to gain favor with the Kenyan government.
June 17, 2011, 12pm PDT
The new country of Southern Sudan, officially declaring its independence in July, will have help from the national development arm of South Korea in building a proposed new capital city.
Gulf News
June 7, 2011, 5am PDT
Rural Africa is learning to embrace bicycles as a means of transportation.
May 31, 2011, 11am PDT
Minibus drivers in Johannesburg, South Africa, were not happy about plans to build a city-wide bus rapid transit system, worrying it would take their business away. After sometimes violent debates, the drivers have compromised with the city.
May 5, 2011, 10am PDT
The U.N.'s population division has increased their world population projection, previously set to peak at mid-century at 9 billion. Now they say it will continue growing to reach 10.1 billion by 2100, with Africa tripling its numbers.
The New York Times - World